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Monday, 30 March 2020 00:00

A common sign that you may have developed a bunion is by a bump that gradually forms on the side of the big toe. Additionally, it may appear red, swollen, and can cause severe pain and discomfort. The reasons that a bunion may form can consist of wearing shoes that do not have ample room for the toes to move freely in, or from medical conditions such as arthritis, nerve damage, or due to flat feet. Additionally, genetics may also play a significant role in the development of a bunion, and research has indicated the chances may increase as the aging process occurs. Many patients that have bunions wear custom made orthotics, as this may help relieve a portion of the pressure while wearing shoes. In severe cases, if it becomes difficult to walk, surgery may be a necessary option that can permanently remove the bunion. If you feel you have developed a bunion, it is suggested that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can help choose the best treatment option that is correct for you.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Terryl Dorsch, DPM of Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

There is a portion of the foot that contains a narrow space which is located on the inside of the ankle. This is referred to as the tarsal tunnel. If this area becomes inflamed as a result of an injury, tarsal tunnel syndrome may develop. The symptoms that are often associated with this condition can include swelling, pain and discomfort surrounding the ankles, and patients may feel a tingling or burning sensation. Moderate relief may be found when the affected foot is taped, as this may help to keep it from moving. Additionally, wearing orthotic inserts may provide adequate cushioning as the healing process occurs. If you feel you have developed this condition, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer you the correct treatment.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Terryl Dorsch, DPM of Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Thursday, 19 March 2020 00:00

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Monday, 16 March 2020 00:00

The pain that is associated with cuboid syndrome is generally felt on the outer side of the foot. This condition is known to be common among ballet dancers and athletes, and can develop due to performing repetitive movements. Additionally, it may occur from having had a foot injury, such as stepping off a curb unexpectedly, or twisting your ankle. Symptoms of this condition can include redness surrounding the point of injury, swelling in the ankle, and you may experience difficulty walking or moving the toes. Patients have found mild relief when the affected foot is elevated, as this may be helpful in reducing a portion of the swelling. If you feel you have cuboid syndrome, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can prescribe you custom orthotics, which may be beneficial in facilitating a speedy recovery.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Terryl Dorsch, DPM from Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
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