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Monday, 25 February 2019 00:00

Spotting Cuboid Syndrome

Cuboid syndrome is caused by partial dislocation of bones in the middle of the foot. Someone with cuboid syndrome usually feels pain around the middle of the foot or at the base of their toes. There are some symptoms of this condition that, when coupled together, can help to identify cuboid syndrome. Pain on the lateral side of the foot or the side of the little toe is an initial indicator. Pain also tends to worsen when weight is placed on the foot, so activities like walking or jumping may trigger discomfort. It is also possible for the foot to swell and for there to be a reduced range of motion in the foot or ankle. If you suffer from any of these symptoms and think you might have cuboid syndrome, it is highly recommended that you speak with a podiatrist to begin treatment.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Terryl Dorsch, DPM from Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 18 February 2019 00:00

All About Achilles Tendon Injuries

The fibrous band of tissue that links the muscles in your calf to your heel is called the Achilles tendon. This tendon is important for many physical activities, including jumping, running, and walking. Since it is used so frequently, the Achilles tendon undergoes a lot of stress, and too much stress can lead to injury. If the tendon becomes inflamed, swollen, or irritated, then tendonitis is occurring. Tendonitis can cause pain in the back of the leg and around the heel. The tendon can also thicken and harden; if these symptoms are occurring, then it is important to treat it before it gets worse. Complications can arise if this condition is not treated, such as severe pain, difficulty walking, deformation in either the tendon area or heel bone, and tendon rupture. If you think you may have tendonitis, it is recommended to consult with a podiatrist about treatment.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Terryl Dorsch, DPM of Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 11 February 2019 00:00

Identifying Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis mostly affects young adults who engage in physical activities like running or dancing.  It is a condition that affects the forefoot and the most common symptom is discomfort or pain under the big toe joint. Sesamoid bones are tiny bones within tendons that connect to the big toe, and sesamoiditis is a result of them being irritated. The tendons around the bones will also become inflamed, having similar effects to conditions like tendinitis. The onset of sesamoiditis is gradual, the pain usually begins as a minor ache, but after continuous activity the sesamoids become more aggravated. The mild ache will eventually turn into a throbbing pain that will be hard to ignore. In most cases of sesamoiditis, resting the foot will help alleviate painful symptoms. If you give your foot a break from physical activity and the pain persists, then it is highly recommended you make an appointment with a podiatrist to learn about treatment options.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Terryl Dorsch, DPM of Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Thursday, 07 February 2019 00:00

Symptoms of a Broken Foot

If you have fallen or dropped a heavy object on your foot, the result may be a broken foot. There are typically noticeable symptoms that are associated with this condition, and these may include severe pain and discomfort that is felt while attempting to walk, and possible swelling and bruising. If the fracture is severe, and appears to be dislocated, it may be a result of bones that are out of alignment. Patients who have medical conditions which may include diabetes or peripheral neuropathy, may not notice if their foot is fractured, and this may be a result of a loss of sensation. Once a proper diagnosis is performed, which typically consists of having an X-ray taken, the correct treatment can begin. This may include resting and elevating the foot as often as possible, and wearing a cast or protective boot while the healing process takes place. For more severe fractures, an MRI might be a necessary test to aid in determining the severity of the fracture. If you feel you have broken your foot, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the proper treatment can begin.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Terryl Dorsch, DPM from Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Athletes are prone to foot and ankle injuries, because they constantly put strain on both their feet and ankles. Some of the most common injuries among athletes are stress fractures, ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis. Thankfully, there are some ways to avoid these complications. Stretching before any sports activity is important to warm up your muscles and stretching helps your body feel less strained after high-intensity activities. Choosing the right shoes is also important in making sure that you are protecting your feet and ankles. Those with high arches will benefit from shoes with cushion, while those with low arches should look for shoes that provide more overall support. The most important part of preventing injury is listening to your body. If something does not feel right, then it is best to modify the activity or the way you perform it in order to avoid larger issues. If you would like additional information on how to cater to your specific foot and ankle needs, then it is suggested you speak with a podiatrist.

Foot and ankle trauma is common among athletes and the elderly. If you have concerns that you may have experienced trauma to the foot and ankle, consult with Terryl Dorsch, DPM from Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Foot and ankle trauma cover a range of injuries all over the foot; common injuries include:

  • Broken bones
  • Muscle strains
  • Injuries to the tendons and ligaments
  • Stress fractures

Symptoms

Symptoms of foot and ankle injuries vary depending on the injury, but more common ones include:

  • Bruising
  • Inflammation/ Swelling
  • Pain

Diagnosis

To properly diagnose the exact type of injury, podiatrists will conduct a number of different tests. Some of these include sensation and visual tests, X-rays, and MRIs. Medical and family histories will also be taken into account.

Treatment

Once the injury has been diagnosed, the podiatrist can than offer the best treatment options for you. In less severe cases, rest and keeping pressure off the foot may be all that’s necessary. Orthotics, such as a specially made shoes, or immobilization devices, like splints or casts, may be deemed necessary. Finally, if the injury is severe enough, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Thursday, 07 February 2019 00:00

Finding the Right Shoe

Most people know their shoe size and stick with it for life, but a proper shoe fitting could lead to better overall foot health. There are so many types of footwear, but everyone has specific needs when it comes to what is right for their foot. A proper shoe fitting involves both length and width. A shoe should have a wide enough toe box for the natural shape of an individual’s foot, as well as appropriate arch support. Some shoes provide mobility, while others hinder one’s mobility. A shoe that provides the greatest mobility for your feet, ankles, and legs is the best option. The foot is the first place to absorb the weight of our movements, therefore the wrong shoe can negatively affect all weight-bearing bones. If you would like more information on the right shoe for you, then it is recommended you consult with a podiatrist.

Finding a properly-fitting shoe is important in reducing injuries and preventing foot problems. For more information about treatment, contact Terryl Dorsch, DPM from Affiliated Foot Care. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Proper Shoe Fitting

A common concern when it comes to foot health, having properly fitted shoes can help prevent injuries to the foot. Out feet affect our posture and gait, which in turn affects the biomechanics and overall bodily structure. With 33 joints, 26 bones, and over 100 ligaments, the potential for serious injury is much greater than one realizes. Although the feet cease growth in adulthood, they still change shape as they mature. Here are some factors to consider when it comes to investing in proper fitting shoes:

  • Be sure the shoes fit correctly right away
  • Ensure the ball of your foot fits comfortably in the widest portion of the shoes
  • Even though they may look fashionable, improper fitting shoes can either create adverse conditions or exacerbate existing ones you may already have
  • Walk along a carpeted surface to ensure the shoes comfortably fit during normal activity

Keeping in mind how shoes fit the biomechanics of your body, properly-fitting shoes are vitally important. Fortunately, it is not difficult to acquire footwear that fits correctly. Be sure to wear shoes that support the overall structure of your body. Do your feet a favor and invest in several pairs of well-fitted shoes today.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Plymouth, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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